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Weight Loss Gummies: How Safe & Effective Are They?

Mar 4, 2024
Weight Loss Gummies: How Safe & Effective Are They?

There are thousands of online advertisements for diet supplements, such as keto weight loss gummies and other products. Sellers push ads on social media with “instant weight loss” claims and celebrity-endorsed diet products, many of which provide false statements about how these products work. 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate diet supplements, so there’s no way to know if the products are safe or effective without doing your homework. Will the investment in weight-loss gummies result in significant weight loss? Perhaps more importantly, are these diet supplements safe? This article provides science-backed, reliable information on the safety and efficacy of some of the most popular weight loss gummy formulations. 

How do gummies for weight loss work?

Weight-loss gummy manufacturers claim their products work by suppressing the appetite and burning fat. Most of these products are said to help support traditional weight loss efforts like consuming a reduced-calorie diet and incorporating exercise into your daily routine.

Weight loss gummies’ active ingredients 

Among the popular weight-loss gummies are those with green tea or coffee, garcinia extract, ketones, vitamins, and more. Most gummies for weight loss have apple cider vinegar (ACV), designed to augment the keto diet. by helping to decrease appetite. Others have stand-alone or combined ingredients touted to promote weight loss. 

Weight loss gummies

Weight loss gummies reviews

Green tea fat-burning gummies

Green tea fat-burning gummies have ingredients reported to burn calories and fat, support metabolism, and lower the appetite. Ingredients may include green tea and green coffee bean extract, raspberry ketones, caffeine, or garcinia extract.

According to the National Institutes of Health’s Office of Dietary Supplements, many of the ingredients in green tea fat-burning gummies have been found to be ineffective and cause various side effects, from mild to moderate, as described in the following table. 

IngredientWeight Loss ImpactAdverse Effects 
caffeine (derived from guarana, kola nut, yerba maté, or other sources)possible modest effectsnervousness, jitteriness, vomiting, and fast heartbeat
green tea extract (extract only, not green tea beverage)possible modest effectsconstipation, abdominal discomfort, nausea, increased blood pressure, and liver damage
garcinia cambogialittle to no effectheadache, nausea, upper respiratory tract, and GI symptoms, mania (an extreme change in mood or emotions), and liver damage

Garcinia extract is considered unsafe, according to the World Journal of Gastroenterology. Garcinia extract has a risk of causing liver failure.1
green coffee bean extractpossible modest effectheadaches and urinary tract infections
raspberry ketonesnot enough clinical research evidence to determine its effectivenessnone known

Below are some of the more common formulations available and science-backed ingredient reviews on weight loss gummies. These weight loss gummies reviews include studies on how effectively various types of gummies work.

Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) weight loss gummies reviews

Bottle of apple cider vinegar with some apples in a basket

Although not all weight loss gummy brands are the same, most name ACV as a primary active ingredient that promotes weight loss. However, unlike many brands’ popular claims, research does not support claims that ACV promotes fat metabolism or decreases caloric intake by inducing a sensation of fullness and reducing appetite.2 

A 2022 review study examined the results of seven short-term and six long-term clinical trials. Four of the six short-term trials reported that ACV suppressed appetite, but none of the long-term studies supported this finding.

While a review of nine studies suggests that AVC may help reduce blood sugar and lower total cholesterol levels,3 a 2020 systematic review examined data from various studies on the effects of AVC and weight loss parameters, such as waist circumference, before and after use. The study authors report insignificant data to definitively conclude that AVC promotes weight loss.4

In studies that reported positive outcomes for lowering appetite, the concentration level of ACV’s active ingredient (i.e., acetic acid) used in the studies was much higher (at least 24.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) than you are likely to find in products sold over-the-counter or online, and many companies selling ACV weight-loss gummies do not disclose the strength of the acetic acid in their products.3  

More research is needed to support the efficacy claims of ACV gummies for weight loss. 

ACV side effects

Mild side effects reported from the regular use of ACV supplements include:3,5

  • Nausea
  • Tooth enamel erosion 
  • Throat burning 
  • Adverse interaction with certain medications (e.g., diabetic medications and some high blood pressure medications, like diuretics) 
Man with a sore throat

Although ACV weight loss gummies are safe for many people, some exceptions exist.

For example, because ACV has been shown to increase the time food stays in the stomach, these gummies are not recommended for people with certain GI (gastrointestinal) disorders, like gastroparesis. Gastroparesis is a condition involving delayed stomach emptying. Medical conditions in which ACV may not be recommended include:5,6

  • Diabetes: ACV has been shown to lower blood sugar, which could interfere with the therapeutic action of diabetes medications
  • Gastroparesis: ACV worsens symptoms of gastroparesis
  • GERD (gastric reflux): ACV may worsen moderate to severe acid reflux and heartburn
Image of a Keto Gummy for weight loss

Keto gummies reviews

Keto gummies are said to support weight loss when a person is on the ketogenic, or ‘keto” diet. 

The keto diet involves eating a very low amount of carbohydrates and a high amount of fats 

every day. Carbohydrates are the body’s primary energy choice. A low-carb, high-fat diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbs (sugar) for energy, resulting in short-term weight loss.

The main ingredient in keto gummy brands is often exogenous (i.e., derived from outside the body) ketones called D-beta-hydroxybutyrate (D-BHB). A 2022 study found that D-BHB was considered safe for healthy people in their teenage years.7 The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has evaluated D-BHB and indicated that it is safe for consumption.8

Coconut oil with a coconut cut in half

Other ingredients commonly found in keto gummies include:7

  • ACV
  • Limited amounts of sugar (to stay within the keto-friendly range)
  • Sugar alcohols (e.g., maltitol, xylitol, or sorbitol)
  • Ginger extract
  • Pomegranate or beet juice powder
  • Coconut oil 

Keto gummies have side effects

Potential side effects from keto gummies may include:9

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Low blood sugar

Shark Tank Gummies Reviews

One brand of gummies for weight loss gained popularity after posting on the company’s Facebook page that their products were unanimously selected by the judges of the popular show Shark Tank. Thus, this brand, called Purefit KETO gummies, became known as “Shark Tank gummies.” 

Image of several weight loss gummies

A USA Today report challenges the company’s claim to fame and association with Shark Tank. After more than one Facebook post that generated thousands of views, USA Today reported: “The claim is false [about weight loss gummies] Shark Tank judges did not endorse a keto diet pill, nor has such a product even appeared on the show.”  

Purefit KETO gummies

Purefit says its products Purefit KETO gummies and Purefit KETO+ACV gummies “burns unnecessary fat in your body for energy, without affecting useful carbohydrates.” There is no mention of the product’s ingredients on the company’s  website

Similar to the effectiveness of Purefit’s “weight loss gummies Shark Tank” products, much of the information about the safety and effectiveness of the products on the company website is incomplete.

Man standing on a scale in the bathroom

Green tea fat-burning gummies

Green tea fat-burning gummies have ingredients reported to burn calories and fat, support metabolism, and lower the appetite. Ingredients may include green tea and green coffee bean extract, raspberry ketones, caffeine, or garcinia extract.

Green tea in a cup and dried next to the cup

Garcinia extract is considered unsafe, according to a study published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. Garcinia extract has a risk of causing liver failure. 

Many of the ingredients in green tea fat-burning gummies have been found to be ineffective by the NIH and cause mild-to-moderate side effects.

A word from Invigor Medical 

If you are looking for a safe, effective approach to weight loss, you may be interested in learning about a national wellness clinic called Invigor Medical. We practice telehealth medicine and specialize in women’s and men’s health. Our focus is sexual health, longevity-related health issues, and weight management.  
Invigor Medical offers science-backed treatments and prescription medications for weight management, supervised by medical doctors. We offer one-stop, convenient services involving medical consultations, treatment plans, and prescriptions—all in one convenient package. Once approved, your prescription is sent to one of our pharmacy partners, then dispensed and shipped directly to you.

Disclaimer
While we strive to always provide accurate, current, and safe advice in all of our articles and guides, it’s important to stress that they are no substitute for medical advice from a doctor or healthcare provider. You should always consult a practicing professional who can diagnose your specific case. The content we’ve included in this guide is merely meant to be informational and does not constitute medical advice.

References

  • Lunsford KE, Bodzin AS, Reino DC, Wang HL, Busuttil RW. Dangerous dietary supplements: Garcinia cambogia -associated hepatic failure requiring transplantation. WJG. 2016;22(45):10071. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v22.i45.10071 https://doi.org/ 10.3748/wjg.v22.i45.10071
  • Hamilton K, Angadi S, Kranz S. The effects of vinegar/acetic acid intake on appetite measures and energy consumption: a systematic literature review. Current Developments in Nutrition. 2022;6:285. doi: 10.1093/cdn/nzac053.026 https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzac053.026
  • Hadi A, Pourmasoumi M, Najafgholizadeh A, Clark CCT, Esmaillzadeh A. The effect of apple cider vinegar on lipid profiles and glycemic parameters: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. BMC Complement Med Ther. 2021;21(1):179. doi: 10.1186/s12906-021-03351-w https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-021-03351-w
  • Launholt, T. L., Kristiansen, C. B., & Hjorth, P. (2020). Safety and side effects of apple vinegar intake and its effect on metabolic parameters and body weight: a systematic review. European Journal of Nutrition, 59(6), 2273–2289. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-020-02214-3
  • Willershausen I, Weyer V, Schulte D, Lampe F, Buhre S, Willershausen B. In vitro study on dental erosion caused by different vinegar varieties using an electron microprobe. Clin Lab. 2014;60(5):783-790. doi:10.7754/clin.lab.2013.130528
  • Hlebowicz J, Darwiche G, Björgell O, Almér LO. Effect of apple cider vinegar on delayed gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study. BMC Gastroenterol. 2007;7(1):46.
  • Cherta-Murillo A, Pugh JE, Alaraj-Alshehhi S, Hajjar D, Chambers ES, Frost GS. The effects of SCFAs on glycemic control in humans: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2022;116(2):335-361. doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030854
  • EFSA Panel on Nutrition, Novel Foods and Food Allergens (NDA), Turck, D., Bohn, T., Castenmiller, J., De Henauw, S., Hirsch-Ernst, K. I., Maciuk, A., Mangelsdorf, I., McArdle, H. J., Naska, A., Pelaez, C., Pentieva, K., Siani, A., Thies, F., Tsabouri, S., Vinceti, M., Cubadda, F., Frenzel, T., Heinonen, M., … Knutsen, H. K. (2022). Safety of β‐hydroxybutyrate salts as a novel food pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2015/2283. EFSA Journal, 20(10). https://doi.org/10.2903/j.efsa.2022.7449
  • Muscogiuri G, Barrea L, Laudisio D, et al. The management of very low-calorie ketogenic diet in obesity outpatient clinic: a practical guide. J Transl Med. 2019;17(1):356. doi:10.1186/s12967-019-2104-z

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